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‘First’ 3D Print Of Heart With Human Tissue, Vessels Unveiled

Scientists in Israel unveiled a 3D print of a heart with human tissue and vessels on Monday, calling it a first and a “major medical breakthrough” that advances possibilities for transplants.

3D heart print

While it remains a far way off, scientists hope one day to be able to produce hearts suitable for transplant into humans as well as patches to regenerate defective hearts.

The heart produced by researchers at Tel Aviv University is about the size of a rabbit’s.

It marked “the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” said Tal Dvir, who led the project.

“People have managed to 3D-print the structure of a heart in the past, but not with cells or with blood vessels,” he said.

But the scientists said many challenges remain before fully working 3D printed hearts will be available for transplant into patients.

Journalists were shown a 3D print of a heart about the size of a cherry at Tel Aviv University on Monday as the researchers announced their findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal Advanced Science.

Researchers must now teach the printed hearts “to behave” like real ones. The cells are currently able to contract, but do not yet have the ability to pump.

Then they plan to transplant them into animal models, hopefully in about a year, said Dvir.

“Maybe, in 10 years, there will be organ printers in the finest hospitals around the world, and these procedures will be conducted routinely,” he said.

But he said hospitals would likely start with simpler organs than hearts.

– Producing ‘ink’ –

In its statement announcing the research, Tel Aviv University called it a “major medical breakthrough.”

A biopsy of fatty tissue was taken from patients that was used in the development of the “ink” for the 3D print.

First, patient-specific cardiac patches were created followed by the entire heart, the statement said.

Using the patient’s own tissue is important to eliminate the risk of an implant provoking an immune response and being rejected, Dvir said.

Challenges that remain include how to expand the cells to have enough tissue to recreate a human-sized heart, he said. Those who would like to conduct further research and studies on human tissue may get some samples from companies likeĀ LifeNet Health.

Current 3D printers are also limited by the size of their resolution and another challenge will be figuring out how to print all small blood vessels.

3D printing has opened up possibilities in numerous fields, provoking both promise and controversy.

The technology has developed to include 3D prints of everything from homes to guns.

Tony Williams
Tony Williams
Tony Williams is a seasoned journalist with over 10 years of experience covering a wide range of topics, from local news to international events. With a keen eye for detail and a passion for uncovering the truth, Tony has won numerous awards for his investigative reporting. He holds a degree in journalism from the University of California and has worked for several top-tier newspapers. Tony is known for his tenacity and commitment to delivering high-quality journalism to his readers, and he is widely respected in the industry for his integrity and professionalism.
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